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Total Lunar Eclipse of April 15: Complete Coverage of the Blood Moon

The first total lunar eclipse of 2014 will occur overnight on April 14-15, and mark the beginning of an eclipse tetrad - four back-to-back total lunar eclipses. Space.com is offering complete coverage of the total lunar eclipse, which will be visible from a wide region that includes most of North America and parts of South America.

Latest Story: Tax Day Total Lunar Eclipse Kicks Off Blood Moon ‘Tetrad’
Fancy a lunar eclipse? Skywatchers in the United States have the chance to see four total eclipses in the next 18 months, beginning with a “blood moon” on Tuesday (April 15), just in time for Tax Day.

The total lunar eclipse will begin at about 2 a.m. EDT (0500 GMT) and last about 3.5 hours. The moon will be fully eclipsed by the Earth’s shadow by 3 a.m. EDT (0600 GMT). Editor’s Note: If you snap an amazing picture of the April 15 total lunar eclipse, you can send photos, comments and your name and location to managing editor Tariq Malik at spacephotos@space.com. Scroll down for more total lunar eclipse tetrad coverage:
-By NASA

comparing underlying data in current studies shows the majority of negative statistics about the welfare of lesbian, gay + bisexual people is primarily attributable to distressing conditions experienced by bisexual people

bisexual-community:

excessofcats:

After doing extensive research on studies comparing the welfare of bisexual people to those of monosexual people, I have come to the conclusion that the majority of negative statistics about LGB people (higher rates of abuse, rape, suicide, depression, poverty, etc.) are overwhelmingly skewed by the inclusion of bisexual people.

When you actually separate them out from gay and lesbian people, gay and lesbian people’s percentages for negative experiences are much closer to that of straight people’s than they are to bisexual people’s. So those high bullying and suicide rates and many other things you hear about - that’s mostly bisexual people.

Worse, in many cases, there are no statistics for bisexual men because their existence is largely questioned or ignored. In fact, Northwestern University conducted a study in 2009 on whether or not bisexual men even exist.

And yet Big Gay Inc + Friends continue to fundraise on this data and not distribute the funding proportionally by actual need or by actual population proportion of the LGBTQ Community population. Or in plain english, bisexual groups + projects get pretty much ZERO funding + programs. Fancy That! *sarcasm*

and PS: No, this in not because "bisexuals are screwed up and confused".

It’s because bisexual people suffer greatly from something called minority stress. Because even though bisexual and trans/gender variant (frequently one and the same BTW) people helped found and build what is now know as the LGBTQ Community, they are still treated as second-class citizens by the mainstream gay/lesbian community as well as by the dominant straight culture which discriminates against ALL people who are not cisgender heteronormative.

“One must state it plainly. Religion comes from the period of human prehistory where nobody—not even the mighty Democritus who concluded that all matter was made from atoms—had the smallest idea what was going on. It comes from the bawling and fearful infancy of our species, and is a babyish attempt to meet our inescapable demand for knowledge (as well as for comfort, reassurance and other infantile needs). Today the least educated of my children knows much more about the natural order than any of the founders of religion, and one would like to think—though the connection is not a fully demonstrable one—that this is why they seem so uninterested in sending fellow humans to hell.” 
― Christopher HitchensGod is Not Great: How Religion Poisons Everything

Meet Decker!

When we’re born, a doctor instantly deems us to be one of two things: Male or female. But gender isn’t just between our legs. It’s also between our ears. So, what happens when how we look on the outside clashes with how we feel on the inside? Do we settle? Do we change? And at the end of the day should gender really be as big a deal as society wants us think it is? In this talk Decker Moss explores these issues and more, as he struggled through not only one but two major gender-related transitions in his life. 

-TEDxColumbus

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